Carlos Casas – Artist, Spain

“Cemetery (Archive Works)”

LS: How important was it for your research to foster further cultural and aesthetic imagery through art, cinema or music?

CC: Research is for me the essence of achieving a sense of new truth, of creative freedom and creative independence. Art is somehow a new envisioning of truth, a new way of seeing the world, of understanding. A new embodiment of truth. It becomes an object of enlightment, a light to change the way we see the world. For me as you have mention these three forms art-cinema-music forms the triumvirate of disciplines that allow me to arrive to that truth. Only through an extensive and deep research one can understand the bottom of the issue of its own research. Research into oneself and research onto ones context, of our essential history and also about the science surrounding our knowledge, I am interested where all the imaginary comes from, where the seed of any artistically search begins, only when I can see the origin of that spark, which everything becomes evident and then I can start working.

Stampede_Chang_archive_works from carlos casas on Vimeo.

LS: Regarding the project ‘Cemetery (Archive Works)’… Could you tell us something more about your process of discovery while beginning this body of work?

CC: One of the things about ‘Cemetery’ process is that it open a lot of possibilities for me in my art practice, it allowed me to put everything on the table to show all the process as a creative path and grant it as important as the final product itself. It was like turning the skin upside down, like opening myself definitely. It has been a long research and still the third part is ongoing, while off course working on other projects, but feeling that the rhythm and timing was a different one. I feel I should not hurry this one. Since the beginning of the project, the moment where I decided I would start working on it. It has been a continuous discovery for myself. Somehow like if the cemetery was also my panacea my mythological envisioning. The deeper I went on research the deeper and furthest the cemetery was for me, it was like all the echoes, all the past all my experience and imaginary was kept like a seed somewhere, for me to discover. To unravel.

CHANG_symphonie from carlos casas on Vimeo.

LS: Katharine Payne discovered that elephants make infrasonic calls to one another at a long distance. In which way her research and intuition help your work for the ‘Cemetery’ soundtrack?

CC: The research of Katy Payne came more like a confirmation of my theories around the sensitivity of elephants it was more like if scientific knowledge was supporting a sense of spiritual need I was searching. Her work is fascinating in a sense of opening a door to a still unknown territory of the real function of animals in the evolution on the planet, and its relation to human beings. All this is a mystery, and somehow fascinates me. That it exists another interrelation between the animal kingdom, and us and especially with elephants. In relation to the music it has been an influence to understand the relation of sound and communication, and how the idea of sound is used also in our contemporary communication not only as music, but also as a social tool.

Chang_elephanthunt from carlos casas on Vimeo.

LS: What attracted you towards landscape, urban spaces and evanescent and unstable horizons?

CC: Landscape is the background for everything, it contains everything, I am very related to the romantic idea of landscape, and also very related to the idea of entropy in the Smithson way, very influenced by that particular period of contemporary art where landscape was primordial. Parallel to that I am also highly influenced by the idea of landscape in the explorer mind, in the discovery of territory, as a metaphor for knowledge for comprehension of the human position in the universe, in this sense I am fascinated by the exploration race era. In the last century when our planet was having few blank spots on the map.

Toomai_elephant_dance from carlos casas on Vimeo.

LS: How much importance do you attach to the social, economic, or political aspects of what you exhibit? Why the anthropological side of your work is so important?

CC: The social context is always the main one but in the sense of us being social animals, of us interwoven by social rules by social exchange. But I feel that anthropologically I am more fascinated to unravel questions that go beyond the present time, or the political, which somehow is the shortest parameter, I believe that I am more interested in long-term issues, I may even say in long distant issues. Or somehow omnipresent.

Junglebokk_intro from carlos casas on Vimeo.

LS: Francisco Lopez ‘La Selva’, Geir Jenssen ‘Cho Oyu 8201’, Lionel Marchetti ‘Noord Five Atlantica’ are sonic adventures in some of the most inaccessible places of the earth. In my opinion these works explore with wonderfully richness and relentless strength our idea of ‘limit’. For you the use of Fieldworks in music recalls in some way landscape photography?

CC: It is interesting you mention this three works, since all of them are somehow been an influence, for me my concept of fieldwork is very related to the idea of sound field recording, for me the visual it is key, and it forges all the relation with the sonic world, that is why in my fieldwork I am devoting a research on the non visible, like radio frequencies, and other sonic phenomena, which for me are an integral part of the landscape as much as the physical is.

Sheerkhan_Junglebook_archive_works from carlos casas on Vimeo.

 

LS: Endless distance and the absolute: what is the contemporary sublime for you?

CC: Well that is a quite difficult question to answer, since the essence of the sublime is the quite essence and subject matter of art, and in so it changes, somehow the sublime now it is changing into new matters and again a certain kind of sublimity is related to certain new types of terrain vague, of new hollow spaces, or urban detritus landscapes, if we speak about subject matter, but also somehow I found the sublime sometimes in the way old societies become new, and how civilization leaves new patterns and changes in their structural behaviors, and in doing so leave physical traces, I am really interested in architecture in the so called new ruins in modern societies, I am interested at their border of decadence questioning the position of civilization, I am really interested in that, in a modern sense of entropy applied to societies, to culture, and how that culture becomes somehow sublime. In its representations.

Tarzan_archive_works from carlos casas on Vimeo.

LS: ‘Avalanche’ is your project dedicated to Pamir (“The roof of the world” in the Persian language). What about your collaboration with the musician/filmmaker Phil Niblock? … I really like his experimental films from the late sixties… Do you like his past work?

CC: Avalanche is my first collaboration with Niblock, and it came out of a dream and will to pay homage to his work and also to work with his music, which for me was important in relation to the landscape I was going to film. I would like to explain a bit how our collaboration went, since I think it is very pertinent for a magazine like yours called landscapes stories. When I asked Phil to work in the film I was imagining his music being a sort of colant of the film a guiding force in relation to the landscape to the mountains that somehow were the key to understand the place and the people living there, Phil gave one of his new compositions Stosspeng, that somehow for him expressed what we spoke about the landscape and place I was about to film. With this music I filmed all the landscapes shots of the film, so I was traveling with my camera and Phil’s music while shooting all the images, and the music was changing the way I was looking at the landscape and also was changing the landscape itself, that is why Avalanche has a 1 hour overture with Phil’s music as a way for the spectator to tune to the landscape to the place, and then the film starts, and you fully understand the people. His works has been a key influence on my work, musically and filmic wise. His series ‘Movement of people working’ is for me one of the most moving examples of the new cinematic experience, and to bring back the term sublime Niblock work is really upbringing a new sublime. And somehow as Phill would put it expanding the intermedia and cross discipline, his work has questioned the cinematic and also the contemporary music experience, and his influence is still to be fully understood.

ElephantBoy_ from carlos casas on Vimeo.

LS: You steers the Von Archives label with Nico Vascellari. Could you tell me something more about this?

CC: Von Archives is a label that wants to release visual and sound explorations, we are interested in the new pollination between the visual and sound arts, we are presenting as we called the new visual sound movement, which proudly we believe we have somehow helped to develop and bring value.

Tarzan_Archive works_Foldedfilm_ from carlos casas on Vimeo.

LS: You are currently working on a film about a cemetery of elephants on the borders between India and Nepal. What about your next projects?

CC: In October I presented in London in the Sottovoce festival, my new work, WAR and PEACE, it is again a visual sound work part of my archive works experimental series, is kind of homage to soviet film and music, based on War and Peace the classic Bondarchuk film based on Tolstoy novel, and the DVD release is expected before the end of the year. But I will be presenting it in several festivals and exhibitions during this and next year. I am preparing a new 5.1 mix of the work that promises to be an amazing visual sound experience. In the meantime I am preparing the release of a book with the three-part research on Cemetery, which hopefully will see the light next year. And off course my series of Fieldworks will continue, I am preparing journeys to Turkmenistan, the Philippines and Mali before the end of the year.

www.carloscasas.net

www.vonarchives.com

Interview by Gianpaolo Arena

 

Carlos Casas – Artista, Spagna

“Cemetery (Archive Works)”

LS: Quanto importante è stato per la sua ricerca nutrire un immaginario culturale ed estetico attraverso l’arte, il cinema o la musica?

CC: Per me la ricerca è l’essenza del raggiungere un senso di verità nuovo, di libertà ed indipendenza creativa. L’arte è in qualche modo una nuova visione della verità, un nuovo modo di vedere il mondo, di capire. Un nuovo accorpamento della verità. Diventa un oggetto illuminante, una luce verso un cambiamento del modo in cui vediamo il mondo. Per me, visto che ha menzionato queste tre forme arte-cinema-musica, queste sono le discipline che mi permettono di arrivare a quella verità. Soltanto attraverso un’estesa ed approfondita ricerca si può capire il fondamento della questione sotto esame. La ricerca dentro se stessi e nel proprio contesto, della nostra storia essenziale e della scienza che circonda la nostra conoscenza; io sono interessato da dove tutto questo immaginario proviene, dove il seme di ogni ricerca artistica inizia. Solamente quando posso vedere l’origine di quella scintilla, tutto diventa evidente e posso cominciare a lavorare.

Stampede_Chang_archive_works from carlos casas on Vimeo.

LS: Per quanto riguarda il progetto ‘Cemetery (Archive Works)’… ci potrebbe dire qualcosa di più sul suo processo di scoperta all’inizio di questo lavoro?

CC: Il processo che ha portato a ‘Cemetery’ ha aperto per me molte possibilità nella mia pratica artistica; mi ha permesso di mettere tutto sul tavolo per mostrare l’intero processo come un sentiero creativo ed attribuirgli tanta importanza quanta ne ha il prodotto finito. Fu come rigirare la pelle, come aprirmi definitivamente. E’ stata una lunga ricerca e la terza parte è ancora pendente, mentre ovviamente lavoro su altri progetti, ma sentendo che il ritmo e la cadenza sono diversi. Sento che non devo affrettare questo qui. Dall’inizio del progetto, il momento in cui decisi che avrei cominciato a lavorarci. E’ stata una scoperta continua per me. In qualche modo come se ‘Cemetery’ fosse anche la mia panacea, la mia visione mitologica. Più approfondivo con la ricerca, più lontano ‘Cemetery’ diventava per me; era come tutti gli eco, tutto il passato, tutte le mie esperienze ed immaginario erano custoditi come un seme da qualche parte, per farmeli scoprire.

CHANG_symphonie from carlos casas on Vimeo.

LS: Katharine Payne ha scoperto che gli elefanti emettono richiami infrasonici tra loro a grandi distanze. In che modo la sua ricerca e intuizione aiutano il suo lavoro per la colonna sonora di ‘Cemetery’?

CC: La ricerca di Katy Payne arrivò più come una conferma delle mie teorie circa la sensibilità degli elefanti; fu come se la conoscenza scientifica stesse dando supporto ad un senso di bisogno spirituale che stavo cercando.
Il suo lavoro è affascinante nel senso che apre una porta ad un territorio ancora sconosciuto, quello della funzione reale degli animali nell’evoluzione del pianeta, e la sua relazione con gli esseri umani. Tutto ciò è un mistero, e in qualche modo mi affascina. Il fatto che esista un’altra relazione all’interno del regno animale, specialmente tra noi e gli elefanti. Per quanto riguarda la musica, ha avuto grande influenza il capire la relazione tra il suono e la comunicazione, e come l’idea di suono sia utilizzata nella nostra comunicazione contemporanea non soltanto come musica, ma anche come strumento sociale.

Chang_elephanthunt from carlos casas on Vimeo.

LS: Cosa la attrae tra paesaggio, spazio urbano ed orizzonti evanescenti ed instabili?

CC: Un paesaggio è lo sfondo di ogni cosa, contiene ogni cosa. Mi rapporto molto all’idea di paesaggio romantico, e anche all’idea di entropia alla maniera di Smithson, molto influenzato da quel particolare periodo dell’arte contemporanea dove il paesaggio era primordiale. Parallelamente a ciò, sono anche grandemente influenzato dall’idea di paesaggio nella mente dell’esploratore, nella scoperta di posti nuovi, come metafora di comprensione della posizione dell’uomo nell’universo; in questo senso sono affascinato dall’era dell’esplorazione della razza. Nell’ultimo secolo, quando il nostro pianeta aveva spazi bianchi sulla mappa.

Toomai_elephant_dance from carlos casas on Vimeo.

LS: Quanta importanza attribuisce agli aspetti sociali, economici o politici di ciò che documenta? Perchè il lato antropologico del suo lavoro è così importante?

CC: Il contesto sociale è sempre quello principale, nel senso che siamo animali sociali, ci intrecciamo tramite regole sociali attraverso lo scambio sociale. Credo però che antropologicamente, io sia più affascinato dallo scoprire questioni che vanno al di là del presente, o della politica, la quale in qualche modo è il parametro più breve; credo d’essere più interessato ad argomenti più a lungo termine, potrei anche dire a lunga distanza. In qualche modo onnipresenti.

Junglebokk_intro from carlos casas on Vimeo.

LS: ‘La Selva’ di Francisco Lopez, ‘Cho Oyu 8201′ di Geir Jenssen, ‘Noord Five Atlantica’ di Lionel Marchetti sono avventure sonore in alcuni dei luoghi più inaccessibili del pianeta. Secondo me questi lavori esplorano con meravigliosa ricchezza e forza infinita la nostra idea di “limite”. Per lei l’uso dei “Fieldworks” nella musica richiama in qualche maniera la fotografia paesaggistica?

CC: E’ interessante che menziona questi tre lavori, dato che mi hanno tutti influenzato; per me il concetto di lavoro sul campo è strettamente collegato all’idea di registrazioni di suoni ambientali. Secondo me la visuale è la chiave, e forgia tutte le relazioni con il mondo sonoro; questo è il perchè nel mio lavoro sul campo mi dedico alla ricerca del non visibile, come frequenze radio ed altri fenomeni sonori, che per me sono una parte integrante del paesaggio, tanto quanto gli elementi fisici.

Sheerkhan_Junglebook_archive_works from carlos casas on Vimeo.

 

LS: Distanza infinita e l’assoluto: che cos’è il sublime contemporaneo per lei?

CC: Bene, questa è una domanda difficile da rispondere, dato che l’essenza del sublime è l’essenza e il soggetto dell’arte, e in quanto tale cambia; in qualche modo il sublime di ora cambia verso nuove cose e ancora un certo tipo di sublimità è collegata a certi nuovi tipi di terrain vague, spazi vuoti, o paesaggi detritici urbani, se parliamo di materiali, ma trovo anche a volte il sublime nel modo in cui le società vecchie diventano nuove, e come la civilizzazione lascia nuovi schemi e cambia nella propria struttura comportamentale, e così facendo lascia traccie fisiche. Sono davvero interessato all’architettura, alle così definite nuove rovine nella società moderna; sono interessato al loro confine di decadenza che mette in questione la posizione della civilizzazione. Ciò mi interessa molto, un senso moderno di entropia applicata alle società, alla cultura, e come quella cultura diventa in qualche modo sublime, nelle sue rappresentazioni.

Tarzan_archive_works from carlos casas on Vimeo.

LS: ‘Avalanche’ è il suo progetto dedicato al Pamir (“Il tetto del mondo” in lingua persiana). Cosa ci dice della sua collaborazione con il musicista/regista Phil Niblock?… Amo veramente i suoi film sperimentali della fine degli anni sessanta… Le piacciono i suoi lavori passati?

CC: Avalanche è la mia prima collaborazione con Niblock, ed ebbe origine da un sogno e vuole rendere omaggio al suo lavoro e anche per lavorare con la sua musica, che per me era importante in relazione al paesaggio che avrei fimato. Vorrei spiegare un pò come andò la nostra collaborazione, dato che penso sia molto pertinente per una rivista come la vostra chiamata Landscape Stories. Quando chiesi a Phil di lavorare nel film, mi immaginavo che la sua musica fosse una sorta di collante nel film, una forza trascinante in relazione al paesaggio, alle montagne che in qualche modo erano la chiave per capire il luogo e le persone che vi vivevano; Phil fece una delle sue composizioni nuove, Stosspeng, che in qualche maniera per lui, esprimevano ciò che abbiamo detto sul paesaggio e il luogo che stavo per filmare. Con questa musica, filmai tutte le scene di paesaggio del film, quindi viaggiavo con la mia macchina da presa e la musica di Phil durante le riprese, e la musica cambiava il modo in cui guardavo al paesaggio e addirittura lo modificava; questa è la ragione per cui Avalanche ha un overture di un’ora di musica di Phil come opportunità per lo spettatore per mettersi in sintonia con il paesaggio e il luogo; poi il film comincia e si riescono a capire le persone pienamente. Il suo lavoro è stato un’influenza chiave nel mio lavoro, musicalmente e cinematograficamente. La sua serie ‘Movement of people working’ è a mio parere uno dei più toccanti esempi di nuove esperienze cinematiche, e per scomodare nuovamente il termine sublime, il lavoro di Niblock genera veramente un nuovo sublime. E in qualche modo, come direbbe Phil, espandendosi intermediaticamente e incrociando discipline, il suo lavoro ha messo in discussione l’esperienza musicale cinematica e anche contemporanea, e la sua influenza dev’essere ancora capita pienamente.

ElephantBoy_ from carlos casas on Vimeo.

LS: Lei cura la label Von Archives con Nico Vascellari. Ci può dire qualcosa di più al riguardo?
CC: Von Archives è un’etichetta che vuole promuovere esplorazioni visive e sonore; noi siamo interessati in nuove combinazioni tra le arti visive e sonore. Stiamo presentando il nuovo movimento visivo sonoro, al quale pensiamo d’essere orgogliosi di aver contribuito, per il suo sviluppo e per averne dato valore.

Tarzan_Archive works_Foldedfilm_ from carlos casas on Vimeo.

LS: Al momento sta lavorando ad un film su un cimitero di elefanti al confine tra India e Nepal. Cosa ci racconta dei prossimi progetti?
CC: Ad ottobre ho presentato il mio nuovo lavoro al Sottovoce festival, a Londra. Si tratta di WAR and PEACE, che è nuovamente un lavoro visivo sonoro, parte del mio archivio di serie sperimentali, una sorta di omaggio alla musica e film sovietici, basato su Guerra e Pace, il film classico di Bondarchuk, ispirato al romanzo di Tolstoy. Il DVD sarà disponibile entro la fine dell’anno. Lo presenterò a numerosi festival e mostre quest’anno e il prossimo. Sto preparando un nuovo mix 5.1 del mio lavoro che promette d’essere un’esperienza visiva sonora incredibile. Nel frattempo sto preparando la distribuzione di un libro sulla ricerca in tre parti su Cemetery, e spero che ciò avvenga il prossimo anno. E ovviamente la mia serie di lavori sul campo continuerà; sto preparando viaggi in Turkmenistan, nelle Filippine e in Mali prima della fine dell’anno.

 

www.carloscasas.net

www.vonarchives.com

Intervista a cura di Gianpaolo Arena