Doug Dubois – Photographer, U.S.A.

 “… all the days and nights”

LS: How important are other arts: music, literature, philosophy, etc…  in your work and life?

DD: Music is very important, but I couldn’t really tell you how or even why. When I was in grade school and high school I played the trombone – a strange, somewhat awkward instrument. I wasn’t very good at all, but it got me listening to music apart from the rock and roll, punk and pop tunes that permeated my high school. My father helped me set up a darkroom in the basement of our home and I rigged an FM radio antenna to a pipe so I could get good reception. I was a regular listener to WFMU, a free form radio station that would jump from Mozart to Captain Beefheart, Coltrane to John Cage all in one set. I also caught the obsessive birthday broadcasts of WKCR from Columbia University that played the entire discography of jazz musicians 24/7. I discovered Rahsaan Roland Kirk, Sun Ra and Charlie Parker while I made prints or developed film. So I guess I learned about photography and music together but I couldn’t tell you how one directly informs the other, except that they are intimately, almost physically connected in my mind.

When I was in graduate school, I tried to do a project with a street musician. It failed miserably, but it taught me some important things about the limits of photography and the openness of music.

The influence of literature and film are more obvious in my work. The title of my book, All the Days and Nights is taken from a short story by William Maxwell, a long time editor at the New Yorker and a writer who handles language with transparent grace. I sometimes make photographs based on film stills from a collection I keep on my computer, and my lighting is simply a crude attempt to create a cinematic mis en scene.

I’m not a connoisseur about anything but one of the things I try to convey to my students is that inspiration doesn’t find you, you have to actively seek it out by looking, listening and thinking in places that aren’t easy or obvious.

My father commuting, Summit, NJ, 1984

LS: Larry Sultan and Jim Goldberg are both important influences. As for their personal and professional guidance, has it been decisive for your education?

DD: I first met Larry Sultan when I went to visit the San Francisco Art Institute and sat in on one of his critiques. As a prospective grad student, I felt I had to impress people and kind of made an ass of myself. Larry was generous enough to accept my application anyway. His work wasn’t very well known at the time and his family work wasn’t known at all. I applied with photographs of my family and had no idea how lucky I was to be at SFAI and work with Larry and the rest of the faculty. The most important time I spent with Larry when I helped him print his first exhibition at MOMA. He rented the darkroom where I worked as a color printer and together we made the exhibition prints over a period of several weekends. I think I learned as much in those weekends as I did in my two years of grad school.

I knew Jim Goldberg through his book, Rich and Poor. We became friends in San Francisco and he has given me invaluable advice over the years. He is often, the first person I show photographs to for feedback and advice on editing. He is unbelievably sharp and intuitive – you can see it, of course, in his books and exhibitions. He seems to only get better, more complex and interesting with each project.

Lise and Spencer, Ithaca, NY 2004

Spencer with his violin, Ithaca, NY 2008

Luke, Christmas Eve, Far Hills, NJ 1985

LS: The use of light is very important. To what extent does the light help to create the story?

DD: I’ve been photographing in Ireland and the light there is both beautiful and frustrating. Clouds and storms roll in and out so quickly that at one moment it’s raining, the next you have this incredible storm light, then it all seems to clear up only for the clouds to reappear and take the light away again. Each change in the light alters the tone, color and shape of the scene. You just have to roll with it and try not to get too frustrated.

When it all comes together, it’s amazing. I have a photograph of this 12 or 13 year old boy, Jordan hanging from the light pole at the entrance to his neighborhood. He climbed up this 50 foot pole like it was nothing.  He had to come down so I could set up my view camera. I got everything ready and Jordon went up the pole one more time. It was all there – great light and Jordon was hanging perfectly. I made one exposure and just when I put the dark slide back, three women came running out of three different houses, screaming at Jordon to get the fuck off the pole. All three glared at me without saying a word and went back inside. I got lucky in that photograph but things like that don’t happen often.

I shoot a lot of interiors and for these I am often working with a mix of strobes, ambient light and the occasional halogen light. In this case it’s a production, often taking hours to set up. These can get kind of labored – I’m not as fast as I should be – and involve rearranging furniture, digital or Polaroid tests and a great deal of patience on the part of the subject. My sister and nephew are a great team. One will help hold a light or a reflector when I photograph the other.

In the end, no matter how elaborate or spontaneous the light is, it has to serve the emotional tenor and the meaning of the image. If the light takes over the image you can have a virtuosic display of nothing, and if light isn’t there or it’s not right, then it’s the opposite problem – a poor expression of a great idea.

Jordon up the pole, Russell Heights, Cobh, Ireland. 2010

LS: Regarding the project “… all the days and nights”. Looking at your work evokes a feeling of something like an intimate family album. Could you tell us something more about your process of discovery while beginning this body of work?

DD: The photographs of my family began when I first took up photography as a teenager. They were available and patient subjects for me to use while I was trying to learn how to handle my camera. I didn’t take the images seriously until after college when I made some of the first photographs in my book: my father going to work, my mother with her new haircut, my sister getting dressed on Christmas Eve, my brother in a hotel room. At the time I made them, however, I was still thinking they would lead to something else – photographs of commuters, for example, rather than a project about my family.

Things changed when my father fell from the train on his way home from work. Photographing became a way to deal with the trauma of my father’s accident. I brought these early photographers with me to San Francisco where I was just starting grad school and I would go home to New Jersey during breaks and summers to make as many photographs as my parents and siblings would tolerate.

When the photographs started getting exhibited and published, I had my doubts about the project and how it served – or more precisely – didn’t serve my relationship to my family. I stopped photographing and showing the work for a number of years. When I picked it up again, my approach had shifted away from trying to make photographs in the moment to images and portraits that were more set up and considered. I was also older and able to come to grips with what was at stake in the photographs. In a sense, as the photographs became more directed and less spontaneous, the process became more collaborative.

The photographs do not function at all like a family album – no one in my family would consider sitting down together and leafing through the book to reminisce about the past. Although many of the photographs alone are fine on their own and hang in my family’s various homes, the book itself is not an easy read for anyone.

My mother’s scar, Gloucester, MA, 2003

After the wedding, Gloucester, MA 2006

LS: Do you have a method of working which you follow for each series, or does it vary for each different project?

DD: I’m not terribly systematic and each project makes different demands and offers up unique challenges.  I certainly have a discernable set of techniques and approaches, but they vary enough, I think, to keep things interesting.

In Ireland, I’m often just wandering around with a camera, hoping to stumble upon a photograph – like Jordan up the pole, or a small crowd of people watching a neighbor paint his house, or Kevin and Eirn just getting out of bed at 2 in the afternoon. It’s been a long, long time since I’ve worked that way and it feels fresh and full of possibilities. As long as that feeling remains, I’ll keep at it.

My sister’s bedroom, Ithaca, NY, 2004

LS: Why is your attention often turned towards the details? Is this something you are thinking about during the creation of a photograph?

DD: I think the best photographs and all good art offer up, if you take the time to look or listen, nuanced layers of meaning that only come across in the details. The first impression, as powerful as it may be, will only last and linger if there are echoes and small surprises in the work that can be discovered over time. Details, in this sense, are not simply small, visual clues that can escape your notice but larger meanings that aren’t immediately apparent.

Painting the House, Russell Heights, Cobh, Ireland 2009

Eirn and Kevin, Russell Heights, Cobh, Ireland, 2009

LS: You’ve been teaching for years at Syracuse University in the College of Visual and Performing Arts. About this: to what extent is it possible to teach photography?

DD: I’m a product of academic photographic training and while it is certainly not the only way to learn the craft and not necessarily the best way to become an artist, if you are lucky enough to stumble into the right people and don’t waste your time, school can make a critical difference. I’m pretty confident in my abilities as a teacher but in the end, teachers don’t make artists. That happens outside of school when you try to manage your life and work on your own. The vast majority of art students lose faith in their efforts once the support and community of school is gone.

I know that sounds like faint praise of teaching, but in the end I’m less interested, in producing more photographers — the word has more than enough. My ultimate goal is to graduate smart, responsible, creative citizens, which is really idealistic, and demands a great deal of faith in the promise of education.

Graduate students are a bit different. They’ve already made the commitment to being an artist and I take that seriously. We do our best, my colleagues and I, to connect them with other artists, curators and thinkers who are important and relevant to their work and practice as contemporary artists. It’s up to them to make use of these connections once they get out of school. My favoriteaspectof teaching is when a former student goes out into the world and we simply become friends and colleagues.

Dean cuts Cirara’s hair, Cobh, Ireland,2010

Dean at Kevin’s 18th birthday party, Russell Heights, Ireland 2009

 

Doug DuBois “All the days and Nights” from Landscape Stories on Vimeo.

www.dougdubois.com  

Interview by Gianpaolo Arena

Doug Dubois – Fotografo, U.S.A

“… all the days and nights”

LS: Quanto sono importanti le altre arti: musica, letteratura, filosofia, ecc… nel suo lavoro e nella sua vita?

DD: La musica è veramente importante, ma non potrei realmente dire come o perché. Quando andavo alla scuola primaria e superiore suonavo il trombone – uno strumento strano, in qualche modo scomodo. Non ero molto bravo, ma mi diede l’opportunità di ascoltare altri tipi di musica oltre al rock and roll, al punk e al pop, i quali influenzavano la scuola superiore che frequentavo. Mio padre mi aiutò ad attrezzare una camera oscura nel seminterrato della nostra casa e collegai una radio FM ad un tubo in modo da avere una buona ricezione. Ascoltavo regolarmente WFMU, una stazione radio con un palinsesto molto flessibile che andava da Mozart a Captain Beefheart, da Coltrane a John Cage tutto in una volta. Captavo anche le ossessive trasmissioni di compleanno della WKCR della Columbia University che programmava l’intera discografia di musicisti Jazz 24/7. Scoprii Rahsaan Roland Kirk, Sun Ra e Charlie Parker mentre producevo stampe e sviluppavo rullini. Quindi credo che acquistai conoscenza della fotografia e della musica allo stesso tempo, ma non potrei dire come l’una completa l’altra, ad eccezione del fatto che esse sono intimamente, quasi fisicamente connesse nella mia mente.

Quand’ero alla scuola di specializzazione post-laurea, provai a portare avanti un progetto con un musicista di strada. Fallì miseramente, ma mi insegnò delle cose importanti sui limiti della fotografia e l’apertura della musica.

L’influenza della letteratura e dei film hanno una presenza più ovvia nel mio lavoro. Il titolo del mio libro, All the Days and Nights è preso da un racconto breve di William Maxwell, un editore di lunga data al New Yorker e uno scrittore che tratta il linguaggio con grazia trasparente. A volte faccio delle fotografie basandomi su fotogrammi di film che fanno parte di una collezione all’interno del mio computer, e la mia illuminazione è semplicemente un crudo tentativo di creare un mis en scene cinematografico.

Non sono un conoscitore di nulla, ma una delle cose che cerco di trasmettere ai miei studenti è che l’ispirazione non viene a cercarti, ma sei tu a doverla cercare attivamente, guardando, ascoltando e pensando in luoghi che non sono facili o banali.

My father commuting, Summit, NJ, 1984

LS: Larry Sultan e Jim Goldberg sono entrambi influenze importanti. Per ciò che riguarda la loro guida personale e professionale, è stata decisiva nella sua educazione?

DD: Incontrai Larry Sultan la prima volta quando andai a visitare l’Istituto d’Arte di San Francisco e presenziai ad una delle sue critiche. Come un futuro dottorando, sentii la necessità di impressionare le persone presenti e in qualche modo mi resi ridicolo. Larry fu così generoso da accettare comunque il mio contributo. Il suo lavoro non era molto conosciuto al tempo ed il lavoro sulla sua famiglia non era conosciuto affatto. Inoltrai la domanda con fotografie della mia famiglia e non avevo idea di quanto fortunato sarei stato d’essere alla SFAI e di lavorare con Larry e il resto della facoltà. Il periodo più importante che passai insieme a Larry fu quando  lo aiutai a stampare la sua prima mostra per il MOMA. Lui affittò la camera oscura dove io avrei lavorato come collaboratore e facemmo tutte le stampe a colori per la mostra insieme su un periodo di diversi weekend. Penso che in quei weekend imparai tanto quanto feci nei miei due anni di corso post-laurea.

Conoscevo Jim Goldberg attraverso il suo libro, Rich and Poor. Diventammo amici a San Francisco e mi ha dato consigli di valore inestimabile negli anni. Lui è spesso la prima persona a cui mostro le mie fotografie in modo da ricevere suggerimenti sulle modifiche. Lui è incredibilmente acuto ed intuitivo – ciò si vede ovviamente nei suoi libri e mostre. Sembra continuare a migliorarsi, diventando più complesso e interessante in ogni progetto.

Lise and Spencer, Ithaca, NY 2004

Spencer with his violin, Ithaca, NY 2008

Luke, Christmas Eve, Far Hills, NJ 1985

LS: L’uso della luce è molto importante. In che misura la luce l’aiuta a creare la storia?

DD: Ho fotografato in Irlanda e la luce lì è sia bellissima che frustrante. Nuvole e temporali vanno e vengono così velocemente che ad un dato momento piove e un attimo dopo c’è un’incredibile luce da tempesta, poi tutto sembra schiarirsi solo per poi riannuvolarsi e portare via tutto quanto. Ogni cambiamento nella luce altera la tonalità, il colore e la forma della scena. Devi soltanto fartene una ragione e non esserne troppo frustrato.

Quando tutto prende corpo, è meraviglioso. Ho una foto di questo ragazzino di 12 o 13 anni, Jordan, che penzola dal palo della luce all’ingresso del suo quartiere. Si era arrampicato su questo palo alto 50 piedi come fosse niente. Doveva venire giù cosi che potessi impostare la mia fotocamera. Posizionai tutto e Jordan salì il palo un’altra volta. C’era tutto – Una luce grandiosa e Jordan stava penzolando perfettamente. Feci una foto e misi a posto il volet, quando tre donne vennero fuori da tre case diverse urlando a Jordan di scendere immediatamente dal palo. Tutte e tre mi rivolsero uno sguardo truce e senza dire una parola tornarono dentro. Fui fortunato con quella foto ma cose così non succedono spesso.

Fotografo molti interni e per questi, spesso utilizzo combinazioni di luci stroboscopiche, luce d’ambiente e occasionalmente luce alogena. In questo caso si tratta di una produzione, che spesso richiede ore da organizzare. Queste possono risultare alquanto laboriose – non sono veloce come dovrei essere – e includere la sistemazione di mobili, test digitali o con Polaroid e una gran quantità di pazienza da parte del soggetto. Mia sorella e mio nipote sono una squadra eccezionale. Uno regge una luce o un riflettore mentre io fotografo l’altro.

Alla fine, non importa quanto elaborata o spontanea sia la luce, deve contribuire al tenore emotivo e al significato dell’immagine. Se la luce si impadronisce della scena e dell’immagine, si ottiene uno sfoggio virtuoso di nulla, e se la luce non c’è o non è quella giusta, allora si ha il problema opposto – un’espressione povera di una grande idea.

LS: Per quanto riguarda il progetto “… all the days and nights”. Guardare il suo lavoro evoca un sentore di qualcosa di simile ad un intimo album di famiglia. Può dirci qualcosa di più circa il suo processo di scoperta all’inizio di questo lavoro?

DD: Le fotografie della mia famiglia cominciarono quando iniziai a fotografare quando ero un adolescente. Loro erano soggetti disponibili e pazienti che potevo usare mentre imparavo a maneggiare la mia fotocamera. Non presi le immagini sul serio fino a quando dopo il college non ne realizzai l’inizio di un libro con alcune d’esse: mio padre che andava al lavoro, mia madre con la sua nuova acconciatura, mia sorella che si vestiva per la cena di Natale, persino mio fratello in una stanza d’hotel. Al tempo comunque, pensavo ancora che avrebbero condotto a qualcosa di diverso – fotografie di pendolari, ad esempio, piuttosto che un progetto sulla mia famiglia.

Le cose cambiarono quando mio padre cadde dal treno tornando dal lavoro. Fotografare diventò un modo per reagire al trauma dell’incidente di mio padre. Portai queste fotografie degli albori con me a San Francisco dove stavo solamente iniziando il dottorato. Sarei tornato a casa nel New Jersey durante le vacanze e le estati e avrei fatto tante foto quante i miei genitori e familiari ne avrebbero tollerate.

Quando le fotografie cominciarono ad essere esposte e pubblicate, avevo le mie riserve sul progetto e il suo scopo – o più precisamente non aveva scopo in relazione a me e alla mia famiglia. Smisi di fotografare e di mostrare il lavoro per alcuni anni. Quando lo presi nuovamente, il mio approccio si era allontanato dal cercare di fare foto del momento, invece cercai di ottenere immagini e ritratti più costruiti e considerati. Ero anche più vecchio e capace di afferrare i rischi della fotografia. In qualche modo, mentre le fotografie diventavano più precise e meno spontanee, il processo divenne più collaborativo.

Le foto non avevano più la funzione di album di famiglia – nessuno nella mia famiglia avrebbe considerato di sedersi tutti insieme e di sfogliare le pagine in cerca di memorie del passato. Nonostante molte delle foto stanno bene per conto loro e sono appese nelle case dei miei familiari, il libro stesso non è di facile lettura per nessuno.

My mother’s scar, Gloucester, MA, 2003

After the wedding, Gloucester, MA 2006

LS: Ha un metodo di lavoro che segue per ogni serie, o cambia per ciascun progetto?

DD: Non sono terribilmente sistematico e ogni progetto impone delle necessità diverse offrendo sfide uniche. Certamente possiedo un bagaglio di tecniche e modi di affrontare i progetti, ma variano abbastanza, penso, al fine di mantenere le cose interessanti.

In Irlanda, spesso girovago senza meta con la macchina fotografica, sperando di imbattermi in una fotografia – come Jordan sul palo, o una piccola folla di persone che osservano un vicino che pittura la sua casa, o Kevin ed Eirn che si alzano dal letto alle 2 del pomeriggio. Ho lavorato in questo modo per molto tempo e lo sento come un metodo fresco e pieno di possibilità. Fino a che mi sentirò così, continuerò allo stesso modo.

My sister’s bedroom, Ithaca, NY, 2004

LS: Perché la sua attenzione è spesso rivolta verso i dettagli? Ciò è qualcosa a cui pensa durante la creazione di una fotografia?

DD: Penso che le migliori fotografie e tutta la buona arte offrono, se si prende il tempo di guardare o ascoltare, sfumature e strati di significato che sono trasmessi solamente dal dettaglio. La prima impressione, tanto potente come può essere, durerà soltanto se ci sono eco e piccole sorprese nel lavoro le quali possono essere scoperte nel tempo. I dettagli, in questo senso, non sono semplicemente piccoli, indizi visivi che possono sfuggire alla nostra attenzione ma significati più grandi che non sono immediatamente apparenti.

Painting the House, Russell Heights, Cobh, Ireland 2009

Eirn and Kevin, Russell Heights, Cobh, Ireland, 2009

LS: Lei ha insegnato per anni alla Syracuse University al College of Visual and Perfoming Arts. Riguardo a ciò: fino a che punto si può insegnare la Fotografia?

DD: Io stesso sono un prodotto dell’addestramento fotografico accademico e mentre questo non è certamente l’unico modo per imparare il mestiere e non necessariamente il migliore per diventare un artista, se sei abbastanza fortunato di imbatterti nelle persone giuste, la scuola può fare una differenza critica. Sono abbastanza fiducioso nelle mie capacità di insegnante ma alla fine, gli insegnanti non creano artisti. Ciò succede al di fuori della scuola quando provi ad amministrare la tua vita e a lavorare da solo. La stragrande maggioranza degli studenti d’arte perdono la fede nei loro sforzi una volta che il supporto e la comunità della scuola sono finiti.

Lo so che questo sembra essere una finta lode all’insegnamento, ma alla fine sono meno interessato nel produrre più fotografi – il mondo ne ha più che a sufficienza. Il mio scopo ultimo, è di far laureare cittadini intelligenti, responsabili e creativi, il quale è realmente idealista, e richiede un grande quantitativo di fede nel sistema educativo.

Gli studenti post-laurea sono un po’ diversi. Loro hanno già preso un impegno con loro stessi d’essere un’artista e io lo considero seriamente. Io e i miei colleghi facciamo del nostro meglio per metterli in contatto con altri artisti, curatori e pensatori che sono rilevanti e importanti nel loro lavoro e che esercitano da artisti contemporanei. Alla fine sta a loro usare bene questi contatti una volta che vanno al di fuori della scuola. L’aspetto che più preferisco dell’insegnamento è quando un ex studente va nel mondo reale e diventiamo semplicemente amici e colleghi.

Dean cuts Cirara’s hair, Cobh, Ireland,2010

Dean at Kevin’s 18th birthday party, Russell Heights, Ireland 2009

Doug DuBois “All the days and Nights” from Landscape Stories on Vimeo.

www.dougdubois.com  

Intervista a cura di  Gianpaolo Arena