Eirik Johnson – Photographer, U.S.A.

“American Short Stories”

LS: Do you feel affiliated with any particular photographic schools or artistic movements? Who are the photographers that influence and inspire your work?

EJ: I am a bit of a magpie when it comes to sources of inspiration.  I certainly am interested in a wide range of artists, photographers, musicians, writers and all of these sources come out indirectly in my work at one point or another.  For instance, I have immense respect for the work of Lewis Hine, Dorthea Lange and to some extent Walker Evans, all of whose work became a catalyst for social and economic change.  I think that’s evident in some of the pictures from Sawdust Mountain.  Lately, I’ve become obsessed by the experiential operatic sound installations of Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller.  Their projects helped influence my most recent work, “Madre de Dios”, a photographic and sound-based installation, a sort of virtual journey into the Peruvian Amazon.

Untitled (tree), 2003, from Borderlands

Untitled (cliffs), 2005, from Borderlands

 

LS: How did you first come to photography?

EJ: My parents, while not professional photographers, made pictures all the time and had cameras laying around the house (an old Nikon F3, a Yashica twin lens, etc).  I had a good friend in high school and we became a sort of collaborative team.  One of us would get an idea, say to photograph a certain area of the city at night, and we’d both head out together to do it.  We gave each other the confidence to experiment and it was pure fun.  My dad had inherited an old enlarger from a friend so we built a small darkroom in the boiler room of my friend’s house.    We taught ourselves, again feeding off one another’s ideas.  It was around this same time as a teenager that I happened to visit an Edward Weston exhibition.  I was struck by how he elevated the ordinary to extraordinary.

Stacked logs in Weyerhaeuser sort yard, Cosmopolis, Washington, 2007

LS: Referring to the project “Sawdust Mountain”, what interested you about the Northwest of the United States and what topographic and geographic characteristics were  favourable for your exploration and your interpretations of this specific Landscape?

EJ: I grew up in the Northwest of the United States and my family spent plenty of time in the outdoors.  Yet, it wasn’t until I had spent many years living away from the Northwest and many years growing as an artist that I was able to revisit the region and feel that I had something to contribute artistically.  It’s a wonderfully magical landscape, dark, forested, mountainous.  And yet or perhaps because of this, there’s a strong melancholy undercurrent that exists in the region.  There have been many photographers who have made work rooted in the American South, or the Southwest, or New York and the East, but other than one or two other photographers, the Northwest has been ignored.  I saw that there was a great deal of potential for a substantive long-term project about the region.

Roger Mosley counting Coho spawn nests along the upper Sol Duc River, Washington, 2006

LS: Would you consider this work to be documentary or more as a lyric and personal statement? Could you tell us something more about how the project started?

 

EJ: I see Sawdust Mountain as my own personal and surely subjective response to very real issues facing the region.  The work is documentary in so much as it addresses these larger issues (the relationship between industries and the environment, the financial dependence of communities on such industries and the growing relevance of informal economies), yet I wanted to frame these issues/questions through the wandering eye of a lyrical journey. I actually began the project while I was working on my earlier project “Borderlands”.  It was during that time in 2005 that I was exploring and photographing the western United States including the Northwest.  I remember feeling that there was a whole new and much larger story to be told that went well beyond the ideas I was exploring in Borderlands.  I started taking road trips from my home at that time in San Francisco up through the Oregon and Washington State, I began reading novels and short stories by all the great Northwest authors (Raymond Carver, Tess Gallagher, David Guterson and Ivan Doig) in whose stories the Northwest landscape becomes a central character.

Alley mural, Aberdeen, Washington, 2006

Freshly felled trees, Nemah, Washington, 2007

LS: To what extent are your earlier works related to the new one?

EJ: In all of my projects I keep circling back to several core interests.  Namely, I am repeatedly drawn back to the idea of environmental adaptation, whether due to the marginalization of an urban neighborhood as in the case of my project “West Oakland Walk”, or the sculptural debris of a homeless encampment in the project “Borderlands”, or the makeshift burrowed warrens and nests in my series “Animal Holes”.   This theme of adaptation is certainly present throughout much of “Sawdust Mountain” as well.

Adult books, firewood and truck for sale, Port Angeles, Washington, 2008

LS:How do you choose a location? What attracted you towards landscape, suburban spaces and vernacular architecture?

EJ: My interest in vernacular architecture and structures or suburban landscapes lies in the fact that these are often neglected and ignored places.  We walk by an overgrown empty lot or a dusty storefront without much thought.  In spite or even because of this, there is the possibility of discovery, of exploring something fresh and new in them that’s relevant to a project.  When I’m out working I try to stay extremely open and alert to whatever catches my interest.  It’s quite an instinctual process and I try not to over think my initial decisions.  There is plenty of time for questioning one’s work later in the editing process.

Cindy, Nemah River hatchery, Washington, 2007

LS:Do you think that through your work, you’re in some way conveying your experience to the viewer? How do you feel as an observer?

EJ: I’m not sure that a single photograph can convey my own experience to the viewer.  Perhaps some of my pictures come close, but that’s where I feel the power of the project in book form starts to take shape.  The book as an object, as a completed vision, is where my experience as a creator can be best conveyed to the viewer.  I think as an image maker, as a photographer, you have to become comfortable with the role of observer.  That doesn’t mean one loses the anxiety of approaching a stranger to take their picture, rather it is that nervousness that makes the role of observer so electrifying.

Elwha River Dam, Washington, 2008

 

Grays Harbor, Aberdeen, Washington, 2006

LS:What’s the ideal way to look at your work? (books, exhibitions..)

 

EJ: I think that question depends on the work itself.  Certainly with a long term narrative project like “Sawdust Mountain”, the book format really is the end result.  It holds the story, sets the pace through its sequencing and design.  Yet some projects like “Madre de Dios” is ideally viewed in an installation format.  With that project I wanted to engage the viewer’s perception and senses through sound, time, scale and light.  Certainly a project or body of work can function successfully in both book format, exhibition, or prints on a wall.  I’ve even found that sometimes a presentation or talk can engage the work in new ways.

“Ficus Tree Grove, 4.02 minutes exposure” 2010, from the project Madre de Dios

www.eirikjohnson.com

Untitled (tree), 2003, from Borderlands

Untitled (cliffs), 2005, from Borderlands

 

LS: Come si è avvicinato inizialmente alla fotografia?

EJ: I miei genitori, nonostante non fossero fotografi professionisti, facevano fotografie tutto il tempo e avevano macchine fotografiche dappertutto per la casa (una vecchia Nikon F3, una Yashica biottica, ecc…). Avevo un caro amico alle superiori e divenimmo una specie di team collaborativo. Uno di noi aveva un’idea, diciamo di fotografare una certa zona della città di notte, ed entrambi ci preparavamo a realizzarla. Ci incoraggiavamo l’un l’altro a sperimentare ed era divertimento puro. Mio padre aveva ereditato un vecchio ingranditore da un amico, così costruimmo una piccola camera oscura nel locale caldaia a casa del mio amico. Imparammo da soli, di nuovo nutrendoci delle idee l’uno dell’altro. Fu circa in questo periodo, ero un adolescente, che visitai una mostra di Edward Weston. Fui colpito da come elevava l’ordinario a straordinario.

Stacked logs in Weyerhaeuser sort yard, Cosmopolis, Washington, 2007

LS: In riferimento al progetto “Sawdust Mountain”, cosa colse il suo interesse nel nord-ovest degli Stati Uniti e che caratteristiche topografiche e geografiche  furono favorevoli alla sua esplorazione e interpretazione di questo specifico paesaggio?

EJ: Crebbi nel nord-ovest degli Stati Uniti e la mia famiglia passò molto tempo all’aria aperta. Comunque, non fu fino a quando spesi molti anni vivendo lontano dal nord-ovest e molti anni crescendo come artista che riuscii a rivisitare la regione e a sentire che avevo qualcosa da aggiungere artisticamente. E’ un paesaggio meravigliosamente magico, scuro, boscoso, montagnoso. Ad ogni modo, forse proprio per questo, c’è una forte connotazione melanconica che esiste nella regione. Ci sono stati molti fotografi che hanno radicato i loro lavori nel sud americano, o nel sud-ovest, o a New York e nell’est, ma ad esclusione di uno o due fotografi il nord-ovest è stato ignorato. Vidi che c’era un gran potenziale per un progetto sostanziale a lungo termine sulla regione.

Roger Mosley counting Coho spawn nests along the upper Sol Duc River, Washington, 2006

LS: Considera questo lavoro come un’attività di documentazione o più come un’espressione lirica e  personale? Può dirci qualcosa in più su come iniziò il progetto?

 

EJ:Considero Sawdust Mountain come la mia reazione personale e soggettiva a situazioni molto reali che la regione sta affrontando. Questo lavoro è documentazione in quanto interpreta queste problematiche più grandi (la relazione tra le industrie e l’ambiente, la dipendenza economica delle comunità da tali industrie e la crescente rilevanza di “economie informali”), quindi volevo incorniciare queste situazioni/istanze attraverso l’occhio errabondo di un viaggio personale.
Sinceramente cominciai il progetto mentre stavo lavorando su quello precedente, “Borderlands”. Fu in quel periodo, nel 2005 che stavo esplorando e fotografando gli Stati Uniti occidentali, nord-ovest incluso. Ricordo che sentii la nascita di una storia completamente nuova e molto più grande da essere raccontata, che andava ben oltre le idee che stavo esplorando per Borderlands. Cominciai a viaggiare per strada da casa mia, al tempo a San Francisco, verso nord attraverso l’Oregon e lo stato di Washington. Cominciai a leggere romanzi e racconti scritti da grandi autori del nord-ovest (Raymond Carver, Tess Gallagher, David Guterson e Ivan Doig) nelle cui storie il paesaggio del nord-ovest ha un ruolo centrale.

Alley mural, Aberdeen, Washington, 2006

Freshly felled trees, Nemah, Washington, 2007

LS: Fino a che punto i suoi lavori precedenti sono collegati a quello nuovo?

EJ: In tutti i miei progetti continuo a ritornare a diversi interessi centrali. In altre parole, sono ripetutamente ri-attratto dall’idea dell’adattamento ambientale, sia che sia dovuto alla marginalizzazione di un’area urbana, come nel caso del mio progetto “West Oakland Walk”, o alle rovine sculturali di un accampamento di senza tetto nel progetto “Borderlands”, o alle tane improvvisamente scavate o nidi nella mia serie “Animal Holes”. Questo tema dell’adattamento è certamente anche presente in gran parte di “Sawdust Mountain”.

Adult books, firewood and truck for sale, Port Angeles, Washington, 2008

LS:Come sceglie un luogo? Cosa la attrae tra il paesaggio, gli spazi suburbani e l’architettura vernacolare?

EJ: Il mio interesse nell’architettura locale e nelle strutture o nei paesaggi suburbani sta nel fatto che questi sono spesso trascurati ed ignorati. Camminiamo a lato di un campo vuoto invaso dalla vegetazione o di una vetrina polverosa a cui non è stata data molta attenzione. Nonostante ciò, o proprio per questo, c’è la possibilità della scoperta, dell’esplorazione di qualcosa di sorprendente e di nuovo in questi che è rilevante al progetto. Quando sono fuori a lavorare, cerco di essere estremamente aperto e pronto a qualsiasi cosa colpisca la mia attenzione. E’ un processo alquanto istintivo e cerco di non pensare troppo alle mie decisioni iniziali. Successivamente ho molto tempo a disposizione per mettere in discussione il mio lavoro nella fase di modifica.

Cindy, Nemah River hatchery, Washington, 2007

LS:Pensa che attraverso il suo lavoro, stia in qualche modo trasmettendo la sua esperienza a chi guarda? Come si sente nel ruolo dell’osservatore?

EJ: Non sono sicuro che una singola fotografia possa trasmettere la mia esperienza a chi la guarda. Forse più foto possono avere un risultato migliore, ma questo è il momento quando percepisco le potenzialità del progetto in forma di libro che prende corpo. Il libro come oggetto, come visione d’insieme, diventa importante dove la mia esperienza in qualità di creatore può essere trasmessa al massimo all’osservatore. Penso che come creatore d’immagini, come fotografo, sia opportuno immedesimarsi nel ruolo dell’osservatore. Ciò non significa riuscire a non essere ansiosi nell’avvicinare un estraneo per chiedergli di far parte della foto, piuttosto è questa specie di nervosismo che rende il ruolo dell’osservatore così elettrizzante.

Elwha River Dam, Washington, 2008

 

Grays Harbor, Aberdeen, Washington, 2006

LS: Qual’è il modo ideale di guardare il suo lavoro? (libri, mostre, ecc…)

EJ: Penso che la risposta dipenda dal tipo di lavoro. Certo, con un progetto narrativo a lungo termine come “Sawdust Mountain”, il formato libro è il vero risultato finale. Racchiude la storia, impartisce il ritmo attraverso le sue sequenze e il suo design. Nonostante questo, alcuni progetti come “Madre de Dios” sono percepiti in modo ideale in forma d’installazioni. Con quel progetto volevo attrarre le percezioni e i sensi dell’osservatore attraverso suono, tempo, proporzioni e luce. Un progetto o un’opera possono certamente funzionare con successo sia nel formato del libro, della mostra, o delle stampe appese al muro. Inoltre ho scoperto che a volte una presentazione o una discussione possono indirizzare il lavoro in nuovi modi.

“Ficus Tree Grove, 4.02 minutes exposure” 2010, from the project Madre de Dios

www.eirikjohnson.com

Eirik Johnson “Sawdust Mountain” – Video

Intervista a cura di Gianpaolo Arena