Michael Wolf – Photographer, Germany

“Tokyo Compression”

LS: Are there any photographers, bodies of work or movements that have influenced or inspired you?

MW: The most important single influence in my career as a non editorial photographer has been the German photographer Michael Schmidt with his body of work “Waffenruhe (Cease Fire), 1987″. I also am a great admirer of John Gossage’s work, especially his books. They showed me a way out of editorial photography.

-

Michael Wolf's influences. Copyright © Michael Wolf

LS: Your book ‘Tokyo Compression’ has been selected as one of the 30 most influential photobooks of the last decade by Martin Parr on PhotoIreland Festival. Could you tell us something more about the creation of the book (editing, printing, etc.)? Did you start the project with the idea of making a book?

MW: My first exposure to Tokyo Compression has been in 1995 when I was working on a story about the aftermath of the Sarin gas attack by the Aum Shinrikyo sect. I shot 6 frames of faces of early morning commuters in subway windows which turned out to be very powerful images. I filed them away in a folder labeled “future topics”. In 2008, I decided to revisit the subway station and expand on the series. I spent 20 days (monday – friday) every morning from 7.30 till 8.45 at the same subway station shooting portraits of people on their way to work. During the day, I would eat sashimi and edit what I had shot in the morning. At the time, I had no idea I would made a book out of this. All I knew was that the images fitted well into my overall project called “Life in Cities”. A few months later, I emailed my edit to my publisher Hannes Wanderer in Berlin, and he immediately suggested to publish a book. Together we worked on a layout, sent back and forth between Hong Kong and Berlin as a pdf, and at some point we had a dummy we were satisfied with. The most important decision for me was to crop all the images so that it was a book of “portraits”, not of subway windows. I went through every file and cropped out the faces in the windows, my crop tool set at 8 x 10 inches. This gave the series a formal cohesiveness. The series became a topology of faces, and a metaphor for life in the megalopolis.

-

From 'Tokyo Compression'. Copyright © Michael Wolf

From 'Tokyo Compression'. Copyright © Michael Wolf

From 'Tokyo Compression'. Copyright © Michael Wolf

From 'Tokyo Compression'. Copyright © Michael Wolf

LS: In the project ‘Tokyo Compression’ people are framed by subway doors. Your pictures are all very close to the subjects, as to shorten the distance between you and them. How do you think photography can help in the exploration of the individual? How much importance do you attach to the anthropological side of your work?

MW: This series was only possible because the subway’s station architecture let me get so close to the windows of the train. I could get as close as 12 inches from the subway windows. This was on the side of the train were the commuters could not exit, therefore they had no escape from my camera, except that they could hold up their hand in front of their face, or hide behind the door frame, or in some cases, close their eyes: the thinking behind this is that if they don’t see me, I won’t see them. This element of inescapable proximity is crucial for the series, as I wanted to introduce the act of photographing into the topic. I wanted the viewer of the photographs to think not just about the situation of the commuters, but also about the act of photography, how invasive it can be; to question the moral and ethical aspects of the profession. Is it legitimate to take a photo of someone who does not want to have his/her photograph taken? I sometimes felt very ambivalent about the whole project, as many of the people whom I pointed my camera at obviously felt very uncomfortable. In the end I went ahead with it, because I felt that I was not humiliating any individual, rather, I was commenting/critiquing a social condition. In the end, the pictures became an incredibly powerful metaphor for an aspect of modern society, and kicked loose a great deal of thought about living conditions in mega cities.

-

From 'Tokyo Compression'. Copyright © Michael Wolf

From 'Tokyo Compression'. Copyright © Michael Wolf

From 'Tokyo Compression'. Copyright © Michael Wolf

LS: How does the project evolve since you start shooting? How do you choose the places and people you photograph?

MW: All my projects begin in my stomach: “my head follows my gut”. I see something which exerts a strong emotional pull on me, and I start photographing, often without a clear idea of towards which direction the project is going to go, or if it even is a project. It can take me months, sometimes years to figure out the meaning of what I have done. The project “Sitting in China” for instance, began with a fascination for the vernacular aesthetic of broken chairs. In the end, it became a metaphor for Chinese society in the 1990′s. I have learned to trust my instincts. If something fascinates me, I follow it.

-

From 'Tokyo Compression'. Copyright © Michael Wolf

From 'Tokyo Compression'. Copyright © Michael Wolf

LS: What’s the ideal way to look at your work?

MW: With an open mind.

LS: Hong Kong is a big presence in your work. What do you find inspirational about the city? How do you feel as an observer?

MW: Hong Kong is the city which gave me my career as an artist. I love its diversity and unpredictability. The old and new in such close proximity. Its confucian roots which make it one of the safest cities in the world. Its hard working attitude, its thriftiness. I am eternally grateful. I have the privilege of being an outsider, and therefore I notice more. Someone who grew up in Hong Kong takes the architecture for granted. When I discovered it, it blew my mind. After 17 years of living in Hong Kong, I still feel exhilarated every time I go out and walk the streets. I can still discover something new to me every day. This city fulfills my needs as a visual artist. Hong Kong is also a very efficient place. As an example: in Hong Kong, I can get 30 things done in one day; in Paris, I can get one thing done in 30 days.

-

From 'Tokyo Compression'. Copyright © Michael Wolf

From 'Tokyo Compression'. Copyright © Michael Wolf

LS: How interested are you in the set up (construction, set, composition…) of your pictures?

MW: The composition and aesthetics of my work is of course very important. It’s part of what makes content into art. There are two aspects of this: first of all, the style or composition of my photographs, and second, the aesthetics/form of how I present my work, either in printed form, or as an exhibition or installation in a gallery or museum. The most difficult learning process I had to go through when transitioning from editorial work to working in an art context (this was 2003), was that i had to undo 30 years of “visual brainwashing” which occurred while working as a photo journalist for magazines. I had so internalized the way German magazines wanted images to “look” that I automatically framed photographs the way an art director expected it of me. It was impossible for me to frame images in any other manner. A nightmare! since I worked mainly for Stern magazine, I had adopted the Stern magazine style. I always thought in double page spreads, always thought about where the caption would go on the printed image, and about a suitable space for a headline. I would always keep in mind the gutter which would split the photo in half, and compensate for that. (This is a simplified version of the process, and needs more detailed expounding upon – for instance, in the past 10 years, the way images look in magazines has changed dramatically, and a personal style of shooting is much more in demand and respected. This was not so in the editorial photo business in germany during the 1980′s and 90′s). So in order to be accepted in an art context, I needed to get away from an editorial/commercial style. A great help to me for achieving this was the work of the german photographer Michael Schmidt, especially his project “Waffenruhe”. This work has its origins in the way Robert Adams and also Lewis Baltz and how many of the New Topographic photographers “look,” and not in editorial photography. I studied Michael Schmidt’s work very intensely, proceeded to buy a Makina Plauble 6x7cm camera in order to get away from the 35mm small format camera aesthetic, and practiced photographing Hong Kong in the style of Michael Schmidt. The project “Hong Kong Back Door” is the result of that exercise. This also weaned me of my addiction to Stern magazine double page photo thinking. I recognized that there was “another way”. From there on I felt much freer and could develop outside of the yoke of editorial photography.

Regarding my books, it is very important that I work together with a publisher who allows me a maximum level of input and control over the layout and sequencing of a book. This is why it is usually a good idea to work together with a small independent publisher, for they have the most freedom, and are willing to take risks. Large publishers are at the mercy of their sales team who often determine what the cover image of the book should be. “A photo of an old man on the cover, this will never sell. Put a young good looking girl on the cover, this always helps sales”. The compromises one has to make when dealing with large publishers are often too great and can dilute one’s vision.

The presentation of my work, and the form of presentation in exhibitions is also very important. If you study my projects you will notice that i not only exhibit photographs on a wall, but also installations incorporating photographs and objects i have collected. My first such project/exhibition was Sitting in China” (1996-2000). From each trip I took to mainland China, I always brought back one or two small chairs. After several years, I owned app. 75 pieces. Together with the photographs of people “Sitting in China”, I would exhibit the real bastard chairs I had brought back from my trips as well.

The next installation project was “The Real Toy Story” (2003), for which I collected 20,000 toys made in China at flea markets in the united states. To these I attached magnets and mounted them on walls covered with metal sheets. Imbedded in this ocean of toys were portraits of toy factory workers which I photographed in factories in China. So here I exhibited the objects, and also images of the people who made the objects.

Another installation project is “100 x 100″, a series of photographs of 100 rooms in a Hong Kong housing estate built 1954 (and now demolished). Each room has the same floor plan, and all are the same size: 100 sq. ft. (10 ft, x 10 ft. x 10 ft. x 10 ft.). I will show all 100 photographs in a space which I will have built for myself which is exactly the same size as the room which is in the photograph. Reality shock sets in when the viewer looks at the photos, and then realizes that the room he is standing in is the same size as the photographed room. I will be showing this body of work at the Flowers Gallery in London, opening Nov. 24.

So aesthetics and presentation are very important.

-

From 'Sitting in China' - installation in Cologne. Copyright © Michael Wolf

From 'The Real Toy Story'- show at the John Batten Gallery. Copyright © Michael Wolf

LS: What are you working on right now?

MW: At the moment I am working on another project about Hong Kong vernacular.  Principle photography is done, at the moment I am editing, and next week I meet with the publisher. Hopefully, the book will come out in May 2012.

www.photomichaelwolf.com

Interview by Gianpaolo Arena

Michael Wolf – Fotografo, Germany

“Tokyo Compression”

LS: Ci sono fotografi, opere o movimenti che l’hanno influenzata o ispirata?

MW: Il più importante e unico riferimento nella mia carriera di fotografo non redazionale, è stato il fotografo Tedesco Michael Schmidt e la sua opera “Waffenruhe (Cessate il fuoco), 1987”. Sono anche un grande ammiratore dell’opera di  John Gossage, soprattutto dei suoi libri. Mi hanno infatti indicato una via di uscita dalla fotografia editoriale.

-

Michael Wolf's influences. Copyright © Michael Wolf

LS: Il suo libro ‘Tokyo Compression’ è stato selezionato da Martin Parr al PhotoIreland Festival come uno dei 30 libri di fotografia più influenti dell’ultima decade. Può raccontarci meglio la genesi del libro (cura dell’edizione, stampa, ecc.)? Ha intrapreso il progetto con l’idea di farne un libro?

MW: Il mio primo scatto per il Tokyo Compression è stato nel 1995, quando lavoravo ad una storia sulle conseguenze dell’attacco con gas biologici di Sarin, da parte della setta di Aum Shinrikyo. Scattai 6 fotogrammi di volti di pendolari al mattino presto, davanti ai finestrini della metropolitana. Questi ritratti divennero immagini davvero potenti. Li archiviai in una cartella nominata “temi futuri”.  Nel 2008 decisi di rivisitare la stazione della metropolitana e ampliai la serie. Ho passato 20 giorni (da lunedì a venerdì) tutte le mattine dalle 7.30 alle 8.45 nella stessa stazione a fotografare ritratti di gente che andava al lavoro. Durante il giorno mangiavo sashimi e rivedevo gli scatti fatti al mattino. Tutto ciò che sapevo è che quelle immagini si adattavano perfettamente al mio progetto più generale chiamato “Vita nelle città”. Pochi mesi dopo spedii il mio lavoro al mio editore Hannes Wanderer a Berlino, e lui immediatamente suggerì di pubblicarne un libro. Insieme lavorammo ad uno schema, lo spedivamo avanti e indietro tra Hong Kong e Berlino in formato pdf, e ad un certo punto giungemmo ad una bozza di cui eravamo soddisfatti. La decisione più importante fu di rifilare tutte le immagini cosicché diventasse un libro di ritratti e non di finestrini. Passai i file uno ad uno rifilando i volti ai finestrini, delle dimensioni di 8×10 pollici. Questa operazione diede coesione alla serie. Essa divenne una topologia di volti e una metafora della vita nelle megalopoli.

-

From 'Tokyo Compression'. Copyright © Michael Wolf

From 'Tokyo Compression'. Copyright © Michael Wolf

From 'Tokyo Compression'. Copyright © Michael Wolf

From 'Tokyo Compression'. Copyright © Michael Wolf

LS: Nel progetto ‘Tokyo Compression’  le persone sono incorniciate dalle porte della metropolitana. Le sue immagini sono tutte scattate molto vicine ai soggetti, come per ridurre la distanza tra lei e loro. In che modo crede che la fotografia possa aiutare nell’osservazione dell’individuo? Quanta importanza attribuisce all’aspetto antropologico del suo lavoro?

MW: Questa serie è stata possibile soltanto perchè l’architettura della stazione della metropolitana mi ha concesso di avvicinarmi così tanto ai finestrini dei treni. Potevo stare a circa 30cm di distanza. Questo avveniva dal lato dei treni da dove i pendolari non potevano scendere, quindi non potevano sfuggire al mio obiettivo, a parte alzando la mano coprendosi il volto o nascondendosi dietro i montanti delle porte o, in alcuni casi, chiudendo gli occhi: il ragionamento dietro a questo è che se loro non mi vedono, io non vedo loro. Questo aspetto di inevitabile vicinanza è cruciale per la serie, poiché volevo introdurre l’atto del fotografare nel tema. Volevo che l’osservatore pensasse non solo alla situazione dei pendolari, ma anche all’atto del fotografare in sè, a quanto invasivo potesse essere; per discutere gli aspetti morali ed etici della professione. È lecito fotografare qualcuno che non vuole essere fotografato? A volte mi sono sentito indeciso sul progetto, poichè molte persone verso cui puntavo l’obiettivo si sentivano ovviamente a disagio. Alla fine sono andato avanti, perché sentivo che non stavo umiliando l’individuo, ma stavo piuttosto commentando/criticando una condizione sociale. Alla fine gli scatti sono divenuti una metafora incredibilmente potente su un aspetto della società moderna e hanno scatenato una grossa riflessione sulle condizioni di vita nelle megalopoli.

-

From 'Tokyo Compression'. Copyright © Michael Wolf

From 'Tokyo Compression'. Copyright © Michael Wolf

From 'Tokyo Compression'. Copyright © Michael Wolf

LS: In che modo il suo progetto si sviluppa nello svolgimento delle riprese? Come seleziona i luoghi e le persone da fotografare?

MW: Tutti i miei progetti iniziano nella mia pancia: “la mia testa segue il mio fegato” [tradotto: “i miei pensieri seguono il mio istinto”, N.d.T.]. Noto qualcosa che esercita in me una forte spinta emotiva e inizio a fotografare, spesso senza una chiara idea sulla direzione verso la quale il progetto andrà o addirittura se sia un reale progetto. Posso metterci mesi, qalche volta anni per capire il senso di quello che ho fatto. Il progetto “Sitting in China” per esempio, iniziò con una attrazione per l’estetica locale delle sedie rotte. Alla fine è divenuto una metafora della società cinese degli anni ’90. Ho imparato a fidarmi del mio istinto. Se qualcosa mi affascina, devo seguirlo.

-

From 'Tokyo Compression'. Copyright © Michael Wolf

From 'Tokyo Compression'. Copyright © Michael Wolf

LS: Qual è il modo migliore di guardare la sua opera?

MW: Con una mente aperta.

LS: Hong Kong è molto presente nel suo lavoro. Che cosa trova stimolante in questa città? Quali sensazioni percepisce da osservatore?

MW: Hong Kong è la città che mi ha permesso di sviluppare la mia carriera di artista. Amo la sua diversità e la sua imprevedibilità. Il vecchio e il nuovo così vicini. Le sue radici nel Confucianesimo, che la rendono una delle città più sicure al mondo. La sua devozione al lavoro duro, la sua parsimoniosità. Ne sono eternamente grato. Ho il privilegio di essere un forestiero e dunque di osservarla più in profondità. Uno che è cresciuto a Hong Kong dà l’architettura locale per scontata. Quando l’ho scoperta, ne sono rimasto impressionato. Dopo 17 anni trascorsi a Hong Kong, tutte le volte che scendo in strada mi sento ancora esaltato. Riesco ancora a scoprire qualcosa di nuovo ogni giorno. Questa città soddisfa i miei desideri di artista visivo. Hong Kong è anche un luogo estremamente efficiente. Ad esempio: si possono concludere 30 cose in un giorno. A Parigi se ne conclude una in 30 giorni.

-

From 'Tokyo Compression'. Copyright © Michael Wolf

From 'Tokyo Compression'. Copyright © Michael Wolf

LS: Quanto si sente coinvolto nell’ “impaginazione” (costruzione, set , composizione,…) delle sue fotografie?

MW: Naturalmente la composizione e l’estetica nel mio lavoro sono molto importanti. Sono parte di ciò che trasforma il contenuto in arte. Ci sono due aspetti rilevanti: primo, lo stile o la composizione delle mie fotografie; e secondo, l’estetica/forma di come presento il mio lavoro, sia che venga pubblicato sotto forma di stampa, sia che venga allestito in una galleria d’arte o in un museo. Il più difficile processo di apprendimento che ho dovuto attraversare nel passaggio da un lavoro editoriale ad un contesto artistico (è avvenuto nel 2003) è stato cancellare 30 anni di “lavaggio del cervello visivo” che si è verificato mentre ero foto giornalista per delle riviste. Avevo interiorizzato così tanto il modo in cui le riviste tedesche volevano che le immagini apparissero, che automaticamente inquadravo le foto come il direttore artistico si aspettava che facessi. Era impossibile per me inquadrare le foto in una maniera diversa. Un incubo! Da quando iniziai a lavorare per la rivista Stern, adottai lo stile Stern. Ragionavo sempre nel formato a doppia pagina della rivista; pensavo sempre a dove sarebbe stata inserita la didascalia sull’immagine stampata, e ad uno spazio adeguato per il titolo. Tenevo sempre a mente il solco della rilegatura che avrebbe diviso la foto in due e per questo avrei dovuto compensare. (Questa è una versione semplificata del processo e necessita di più approfondita spiegazione – per esempio, negli ultimi 10 anni il modo in cui le immagini appaiono nelle riviste è cambiato radicalmente e uno stile personale nello scatto è molto più richiesto e rispettato. Questo non avveniva nel business foto editoriale degli anni ’80 e ’90). Così, per essere accettato in un contesto artistico, dovevo allontanarmi da uno stile editoriale/commerciale. Un grosso aiuto mi è derivato dall’opera del fotografo tedesco Michael Schmidt, soprattutto il suo progetto “Waffenruhe”. Questo lavoro trae origine dal modo in cui Robert Adams, Lewis Baltz, così come molti altri fotografi del movimento dei New Topographics [Nuovi Topografi, N.d.T.]“osservano”, e non dalla fotografia editoriale. Ho studiato l’opera di Schmidt molto approfonditamente, successivamente ho acquistato una Makina Pauble 6x7cm per allontanarmi dall’estetica del piccolo formato 35mm e ho fatto pratica fotografando Hong Kong nello stile di Michael Schmidt. Il progetto “Hong Kong Back Door” [“La porta di servizio di Hong Kong”, N.d.T.] è il risultato di quell’esercizio. Questo lavoro mi ha anche fatto perdere la mia assuefazione allo stile della doppia pagina della rivista Stern. Mi sono reso conto che esisteva una “altro sistema”. Da quel momento in poi mi sono sentito molto più libero di poter sviluppare fuori dal giogo della fotografia editoriale.

In merito ai miei libri, è molto importante che io lavori con un editore che mi permetta il massimo livello di stimoli e controllo sull’impianto e sulla sequenza del libro. Questo è il motivo per cui è di solito una buona idea lavorare con un piccolo editore indipendente, poiché ha molta più libertà di azione ed è pronto a correre dei rischi. I grossi editori sono succubi del loro ufficio vendite che spesso stabilisce quale foto un libro (pubblicazione) dovrebbe avere in copertina. “Una foto di un vecchio in copertina non farà mai vendere. Invece la foto di una ragazza giovane e bella aiuta sempre le vendite”. I compromessi che uno deve affrontare quando lavora con i grossi editori sono spesso troppo grandi e possono attenuare la sua visione.

La presentazione del mio lavoro e il modo di presentare una mostra sono anch’esse molto importanti. Se si studiano i miei progetti si noterà che non solo espongo fotografie su una parete, ma anche istallazioni che inglobano fotografie e oggetti che ho collezionato. Il mio primo progetto/mostra del genere è stato “Sitting in China” [“Sedersi in Cina”, N.d.T.] (1996-2000). Da ogni viaggio fatto in Cina, ho sempre portato una o due piccole sedie. Dopo parecchi anni, ne avevo all’incirca 75 pezzi.  Insieme ai ritratti di persone “Sitting in China”, ho esposto  anche quelle sedie infime che avevo riportato da ogni viaggio.

L’allestimento successivo è stato “The Real Toy Story” (“La vera storia del giocattolo”, ndt) (2003), per il quale ho collezionato 20.000 giocattoli provenienti dai mercatini delle pulci negli Stati Uniti e fatti in Cina. A questi ho fissato dei magneti e li ho montati sulle pareti coperte di fogli di metallo. Inseriti in questo oceano di giocattoli c’erano ritratti di operai di fabbriche di giocattoli che ho fotografato in Cina. Quindi ho esposto gli oggetti e le immagini delle persone che realizzavano gli oggetti.

Un’altra istallazione è “100 x 100”, una serie di fotografie di 100 stanze di un complesso residenziale a Hong Kong, costruito nel 1954 (ora demolito). Ogni stanza ha lo stesso impianto e tutte hanno le stesse dimensioni: 100 piedi quadrati (10 piedi x 10 piedi x 10 piedi x 10 piedi). Esporrò le 100 foto in uno spazio che avrò costruito apposta, che è esattamente grande quanto le stanze nelle fotografie. Il colpo di scena avverrà quando l’osservatore guarderà le foto e si renderà conto che la stanza in cui si trova è grande quanto quelle fotografate. La mostra avrà luogo alla Flowers Gallery a Londra dal 24 Novembre.

Quindi l’estetica e la presentazione sono davvero importanti.

-

From 'Sitting in China' - installation in Cologne. Copyright © Michael Wolf

From 'The Real Toy Story'- show at the John Batten Gallery. Copyright © Michael Wolf

LS: A cosa sta lavorando in questo momento?

MW: Attualmente sto sviluppando un altro progetto sullo stile locale di Hong Kong. In linea di massima la parte fotografica è conclusa. Ora sto seguendo l’editing e la prossima settimana vedrò l’editore. Il libro dovrebbe uscire a Maggio 2012.

www.photomichaelwolf.com

Interview by Gianpaolo Arena