Eirik Johnson Sawdust Mountain

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Weyerhaeuser sorting yard along the Chehalis River, Cosmopolis, Washington

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Coquille River, Oregon

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Spawned Coho, upper Sol Duc River, Washingston

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Confluence of the Rogue and Illinois Rivers, Oregon

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Erin Rieman along the Siuslaw River, Oregon

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Missy by her garden, lower Hoh River, Washington

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Scrapped train, Arlington, Washington

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Josh cleaning a Chinook along the Sol Duc River, Washington

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Deborah and William along the Sauk River, Washington

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Tola, lower Hoh River, Washington

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Elwha River Dam, Washington

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Cindy, Nemah River Hatchery, Washington

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Quinalt tribal gill nets, Queets River, Washington

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Below the Glines Canyon Dam on the upper Elwha River, Washington

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Missy, beneath her six-hundred-year-old spruce, Hoh River, Washington

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Grays Harbor, Aberdeen, Washington

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Makah tribal grill nets on the Sooes River outside Neah Bay, Washington

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Rogue River, Oregon

 

When I was a young, my family would hunt for mushrooms in the forests of the Cascade and Olympic Mountains. Some days we would spend afternoons along the shallows of a river watching salmon fight their way to spawning grounds upstream. These were the icons of the region: forest and salmon, pillars of Northwest identity. In returning to the Northwest, I found a wet and weathered region imbued with much history but uncertain future. “Sawdust Mountain” explores the complicated relationship between the region’s landscape, the industries that rely upon natural recourses, and the communities they support.

Eirik Johnson ‘Sawdust Mountain’

 

All images © courtesy of Eirik Johnson

eirikjohnson.com